Game + Movie night (Wadjda)

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The weekends when we don’t happen to have Courageous Girls Club meetings, we have instead family Courageous Girls Club meetings. So last night, it was all about the games. I’ll share a couple, because it’s not easy to find fun games that everyone enjoys… so it’s good to have on your list for just in case. Both games came from the Anima Learning website.

Game 1 - Sound Ball

“Have the group stand in a circle. One person makes a sound—any sound—while also making a throwing gesture towards another person in the group. That second person then ‘receives’ the sound with a physical motion like catching a ball or a sack or a ray of light and—importantly—repeats the sound sent to them. Then, without hesitation, the first receiver sends a new sound with a new gesture to another person in the circle. Keep the sound moving quickly and boldly to get everyone involved.”

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Game 2 - Knife and Fork

Divide group into pairs. Let each pair come up with two things that go together (such as peanut-butter and jelly, train and station, bee and flower,) and act it out obviously without talking, and the rest of the group has to guess what it is.

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Peeling bananas, for apples and bananas.

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The classic coatrack.

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Kid-humor: throw-up.

Some other ones they came up with were: IPhone, sugar and salt, cupcake, etc. We may have bent the rules a bit, since we sometimes used words that were made up of two words, but it worked. And it was super funny.

Then onto the movie, Wadjda:

Image from  IMDb

Image from IMDb

This amazing movie is about a spunky girl from Saudi Arabia, and her dream is to get a bicycle, however girls are not allowed to ride bikes in Saudia Arabia. The movie explores the Muslim rules that both women and men have to adhere to… I won’t give it all away, but it’s so unique. The movie gives you so many things to discuss about different cultures and religions. And Wadjda is awesome, she has the best responses… you’ll see. The movie is probably for ages 8 and up (it works for younger siblings as well who can’t yet read fast, since it’s subtitled, so just don’t read some of the parts outloud that you don’t feel like is appropriate for their age.)